The Best Tours to Take in Louisiana Food

We all know by now that Louisiana food and cuisine is some of the best and most authentic in the South. Backed by several generations-old recipes, it’s hard to go wrong when dining in Louisiana.

One of the best ways to get a true taste of Louisiana and everything they have to offer is through food tours. Thanks to Louisiana Travel, here is an extensive list of the best food tours you can take all throughout Louisiana.

Lafayette, Louisiana

Also known as the “Tastiest Town in the South” according to Southern Living, Lafayette is the unofficial capital of Louisiana’s Cajun heartland.

With everything from local mom and pop shops to high-end dining and everything in between, you’ll never run out of options – which can also be a bad thing. Being overwhelmed with choices and having a limited amount of time to try them all can be frustrating.

Enter: Cajun Food Tours

On this deliciously exciting tour, company founder Marie Ducote-Comeaux will take you on an approximately three-hour tour of at least five locally-owned restaurants. You can choose from four different tour options: the Original Cajun Food Tour, the Breaux Bridge Food Tour, the All-Day Cajun Experience, or the Around the World in Acadiana Taste Tour.

On the tour, you’ll hear stories about the history and culture inhibiting Acadiana (which is another name for Cajun Country) while eating a variety of Louisiana specialties like gumbo, étouffée, cracklins, and boudin.

Baton Rouge

The actual capital of Louisiana, Baton Rouge is known for its eclectic characters, rich history, and amazing Cajun cooking.

Baton Rouge Food Tours invites you to the opportunity to try all of the sweet, savory, and unique flavors they have to offer. A two and a half hour C’est Si Bon walking taste tour takes you through a stroll of downtown Baton Rouge and to at least five restaurants for sampling true Cajun cooking, where you’ll also learn about history, music, art, and so much more.

Avery Island

Avery Island is infamous for being the origin of the famous pepper sauce known as TABASCO. To learn more about the story of TABASCO and the McIlhenny family, click here.

Naturally, the best food tour in Avery Island is the TABASCO Food Tour. Not only will you learn about the company, but you’ll also have the chance to taste dishes that pair perfectly with the sauce. You’ll visit an array of restaurants, like Bon Creole Seafoodand R&M’s Boiling Point.

New Orleans

The best-known hotspot for tourists in Louisiana, leave it up to the perfect guide to enchant you on the fascinating history of New Orleans’ famous ghosts and even more famous (and delicious) cuisines.

Here, you have your choice from three top-rated food tours; Destination Kitchen, Tastebud Tours, and New Orleans Culinary History Tours.

Destination Kitchen’s expert guides will take you on tasting tours of the French Quarter, the Garden District, and Uptown.

Tastebud Tours will guide you to the best known French Quarter restaurants and have five themed tours ranging from fresh seafood, sunset tours, and even a haunted restaurant tour.

For more Louisiana related articles, click here.

 

Louisiana’s Most Famous Food

Louisiana is known for many things, but the food usually makes the top of the list. Louisiana Travel has a list of Louisiana’s most famous food and where to find them. We are sharing some of those with you!

Po’boy

What are they:

A Po’boy is a sandwich Louisiana has made their own. It’s definitely at the top of the Louisiana’s famous food list.  Usually always made up with meat like, fried seafood, roast beef, or even just regular deli meat. But the thing that makes Po’boys extra special is the bread they are served on. Traditional French Bread, which often has a fluffy center and a crispy crust. If you enjoy mayonnaise, pickles, tomatoes, and lettuce then ask for your Po’boy to be “dressed”.

Where to find them:

New Orleans holds theOak Street Po-Boy Festival, which goes on in November. A New Orleans restaurant, Mother’s Restaurant serves one of the best roast beef po’boys. Maybe New Orleans is too far, check out Chris’ Po’boys that is located in Lafayette, Louisiana. They are known to be the best in Cajun Country!

King Cake

What are they:

Round braided dough filled with cinnamon that is covered in icing. Colored sugar covers the top of the King Cake and there is even a little plastic baby that is stuffed inside. There are three colors that are presented on the top. Purple represents justice, green represents faith, and gold represents power. These cakes can also be filled! If you get the piece with the baby, that means you have to buy the next King Cake!

Where to find them:

Metairie is known to have the best at Manny Randazzo’s King Cakes. However, this amazing desert can be found anywhere from Shreveport to the cities that line the Gulf Coast. They can also be found in these pretty amazing places:

Haydel’s Bakery in New Orleans

Atwood’s Bakery in Alexandria

Daily Harvest Bakery & Deli in Monroe

Boudin

What are they:

A smoked sausage casing is filled with pork, rice and spices. It can be served in balls or links. Usually boudin balls are deep fried and served with dipping sauce. The links can also be grilled and served like that. It can be an easy snack or even a whole meal!

Where to find them:

Scott, Louisiana is the Boudin Capital of the World is one of the best places to find boudin. Or not that far down the road, Earl’s Cajun Market is known for their plate lunches and their amazing boudin. They are located in Lafayette, Louisiana. Check out these places for even more boudin options:

Billy’s Boudin and Cracklins

Don’s Specialty Meats

Gumbo

What is it:

The base of gumbo is known as a roux, which is made up of butter/oil mixed with flour. Gumbo is one of the most versatile Louisiana recipes. Everyone cooks it differently. However, there is always a protein and plenty of seasoning. The Creole style gumbo usually incorporates tomatoes while the Cajun style sticks to the “regular” roux. Gumbo is actually the official Louisiana dish.

Where to find it:

Almost every where in Louisiana offers gumbo. If you want to experience the full southern Louisiana experience, try trying some different bowls of gumbo from New Orleans. The Gumbo Shop and Restaurant R’evolution are both located in New Orleans. Want something a little more north? Check out Monroe, Louisiana and visit Warehouse No. 1 for a seafood gumbo.

For more Louisiana related articles, click here, and to read the entire article on Louisiana’s Famous Foods click here.

 

Foods Only Louisiana Natives Know and Love

Louisiana is known for its revelry and its food for good reason- it’s the best in the world.  The unique combinations of spices, meats and other ingredients make Louisiana dishes some of the most flavorful and opulent ones you’ll ever taste.  Some dishes have become favorites for the locals and can be expected at any Louisiana get together or dinner party. We have compiled a list of some Louisiana favorites but click here for a full list.  Grab a napkin and get ready to explore Louisiana culture through your stomach.

1.    Beignets

This delicious deep fried French doughnut made New Orleans’ Café du Monde famous.  Did you even really go to New Orleans if you didn’t check in to Cafe Du Monde?  They are sprinkled with enough powdered sugar to satisfy anyone’s sugar craving. You can also find these delectable desserts stuffed with a variety of sweet or savory ingredients like caramel or fruits.  New Orleans even has a Beignet Festival (powdered sugar heaven!), held in December, that you won’t want to miss.

2.    Pralines

The gooey caramel cookie sprinkled with caramelized pecans can be found in most corner markets in New Orleans and as the years have passed, more and more flavors have been added to the classic recipe. This sugary, buttery candy is made from butter, brown sugar and pecans, cooked in a kettle and dried on wax paper. French nuns brought these treats to New Orleans in the 1700s.They are the perfect compliment to any gift basket or Christmas gift.  The dentist may cringe at this sweet treat but your taste buds certainly won’t!

3.    Boudin

Vegetarians beware! This spicy sausage is filled with seasoned pork and rice and many locals slurp the stuffing out of the casing with one hand, while driving with the other. Boudin is served in links or in boudin balls, which are deep-fried cousins of the iconic Cajun delicacy.  Boudin comes in many flavors and varieties depending on the meats and spices that are included. Earl’s Cajun Market in Lafayette serves up excellent boudin and plate lunches. Head to Scott, Louisiana which is the Boudin Capital of the World. Stop at Billy’s Boudin and Cracklins or Don’s Specialty Meats.  Boudin can also be found on many menus throughout Louisiana.

4.    King Cake

The sweet Danish pastry is a Mardi Gras tradition and usually decorated in colored sugar of purple, green, and gold. Cakes can be plan sugar and cinnamon flavored or have a variety of stuffings like cream cheese, blueberry or other fruit filling, even chocolate or pecan.  The tradition is that whoever finds the baby, which is a tiny plastic replica of a baby, has to buy the next King Cake. The only way to find the baby is to dig in! Bon appetit!

5.    PoBoys

This is a submarine-type sandwich made with French bread. Order it “dressed” if you like your po’boy with mayonnaise, lettuce, pickles and tomato.  A Louisiana favorite comes with fried shrimp or fried oysters but you can get whatever meat you prefer inside. Try one at the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival in New Orleans, held in November. Mother’s Restaurant, also in New Orleans, serves roast beef po’boys with a type of gravy known as debris (pronounced day’-bree). Chris’ Po’boys in Lafayette is among the best restaurants in Cajun Country to satisfy your po’boy cravings.

6. Crawfish Etouffee

This is a Creole dish of rice smothered in a stew of roux, crawfish, herbs and vegetables. The roux (called a “blonde roux” for its lighter color than the kind typically used in gumbo) is a mixture of butter and flour, mixed with celery, bell peppers and onion.  In New Orleans, find crawfish étouffée at Bon Ton Café and Jacque-Imo’s. Outside the Crescent City you’ll find mouthwatering étouffée at The Chimes in Baton Rouge and at Boudreaux & Thibodaux’s in Houma.

For more news and info on Louisiana culture, click here.