November 22, 2018

Best Bread Pudding in New Orleans

Best Bread Pudding in New Orleans

 

  1. Commander’s Palace

Commander’s Palace, nestled in the middle of the tree-lined Garden District, has been a New Orleans landmark since 1893. Known for the award-winning quality of its food and its convivial atmosphere, the history of this famous restaurant offers a glimpse into New Orleans’ storied past and has been the go-to destination for Haute Creole cuisine and whimsical Louisiana charm. The winner of six James Beard Foundation Awards, Commander’s Palace has evolved into a culinary legend.

When Ella, Dottie, Dick and John Brennan took over personal supervision of the restaurant in 1974, they began to give the splendid old landmark a new look both inside and out including painting the outside the iconic “Commander’s Blue.”

Now under the watchful eye of co-proprietors Ti Adelaide Martin and Lally Brennan, the Brennan family’s dedication to perfection has never wavered. A steady parade of renowned chefs like Emeril Lagasse, Paul Prudhomme, Jamie Shannon, and now Tory McPhail have made Commander’s Palace the world-class restaurant what it is today and its leading-edge Haute Creole cuisine reflects the best of the city.

 

  1. Boucherie

When southern Louisiana was still new, the tradition of a Boucherie must have been as ritual to the first Cajun peoples as Mardi Gras and Jazz fest are to us now.

Communities would gather at the beginning of the more difficult times of year to help one another complete their seasonal stores born out of the feast made possible by the whole of the people gathered. Each family that took part in a Boucherie would take home a portion of the hogs slaughtered during the celebration, and every community that held one did so in turn; ensuring that the rotation of the pigs that made up the celebration could last through the winter.

Today, as in the past, Boucheries are both performed as traditional intimate family affairs, as well as being the basis for huge festivals and celebrations throughout southern Louisiana.

 

  1. Red Fish Grill

This vibrant, seafood-centric, polished-casual landmark anchors the first block of Bourbon Street and delivers innovative twists on casual New Orleans seafood. The lively décor, expansive bar, and laid-back vibe beckons both the young and young at heart.

 

  1. Gumbo Shop

This New Orleans institution has won the Best Gumbo category in the Best of New Orleans poll every year since 1999. Instead of a house gumbo, this restaurant offers seafood, okra and chicken-andouille versions of this indigenous soup as well as file gumbo with chicken. They are offered as sides or starters for a full menu of Creole cuisine served at the restaurant or in a variety of sizes to take home for dinner or a party. And the Gumbo Shop’s roux always comes out right.

 

  1. Lil Dizzy’s Cafe

At Lil’ Dizzy’s, producing great fried chicken is a matter of historical pride.Owner Wayne Baquet learned the restaurant trade from his father Eddie, namesake of the legendary 7th Ward restaurant Eddie’s, who got into the business in the 1940s working at Paul Gross Chicken Coop with his aunt, Ada Baquet Gross. Lil’ Dizzy’s is the only Baquet-owned restaurant still going, and Wayne is serious about doing the Creole-Soul tradition proud.

 

  1. Mother’s Restaurant

Mother’s Restaurant opened its doors in 1938 on Poydras Street’s “Restaurant Row”, situated between a thriving waterfront and the courthouse. Owners Simon and Mary (Mother) Landry and his large family cooked up po’ boys for lines of longshoremen and laborers, newspapermen and attorneys. During and after World War II, Mother’s became a local hang-out for “the few and the proud” – the U.S. Marine Corps. The Marine spirit was in the family – five of the seven Landry children (five sons and two daughters) joined the Marine Corps. Francis Landry was the first woman in Louisiana to be accepted into the Corps. This special association with the Marines earned Mother’s the title of “TUN Tavern New Orleans” in the late ’60s. The original TUN tavern was the official birthplace of the Marines during the Revolutionary War.  Mother’s is not just a part of this great American tradition, but also stands as a uniquely New Orleans institution. The likes of other family-owned local businesses such as D.H. Holmes Department Stores, K&B Drug Stores, MacKenzie’s Bakery, and Werlein’s Music have all departed from the landscape, while Mother’s Restaurant has not only remained almost exactly the same, but has flourished.

  1.     Bon Ton Cafe

Originally opened in the early 1900’s, it has long been a favorite of local dining connoisseurs. After a brief recess, Al and Alzina Pierce came to New Orleans in the early 1950’s from their home along the bayous of South Louisiana and reopened the Bon Ton. With them came recipes that their families had created while living deep in the Cajun country of Lafourche and Terrebonne Parishes.

 

  1. Muriel’s Jackson Square

While dining at Muriel’s Jackson Square, you’ll be enveloped by the rich history of the Vieux Carre while celebrating the life of today. Indulge in the spirits of our Courtyard Bar while Sir Antoine and the spirits of yesteryear dine alongside of you. Embrace the historical ambience, feel the energy, and taste the love in every bite as the flavors dance on your palate while you discover a local treasure. Today you can find locals socializing just as they first did when our city was built. Within Muriel’s historic walls, the city of New Orleans was built by citizens that passed through. Today that savor for life can be experienced by our patrons in the award-winning contemporary Creole cuisine we serve.

 

  1. Mr. B’s Bistro

Mr. B’s is one of the brightest stars in the New Orleans restaurant scene. Nestled in the heart of the French Quarter, Mr. B’s Bistro is located at the corner of Royal and Iberville Streets. Cindy Brennan and her famous restaurant family opened Mr. B’s in 1979 and it has become a true French quarter fixture famous for deft cooking of regional specialties in a casual bistro setting.

 

  1. K-Paul’s

In 1979, when Chef Paul Prudhomme and his late wife, K, opened their “modest”, 62-seat K-Paul’s Louisiana Kitchen on Chartres Street in the historic French Quarter of New Orleans, they had no idea the restaurant was soon to become a sensation, with nightly lines of eager diners waiting sometimes hours to be seated. That was back in the days when K-Paul’s didn’t accept reservations or credit cards! But now, under the hands-on direction of Chef Paul the restaurant has flourished.

 

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